Tuesday, 26 December 2017

Summer Learning Journey: Week Two Day Two Bonus Activity: Crossing the Tasman

Bonus Activity: Crossing the Tasman
In 1928, a crew of four men flew, for the first time, across the Tasman from Australia to New Zealand. One of the men on board the Southern Cross airplane was a New Zealander named T.H. McWilliams. His job was to operate the radio in the airplane. Unfortunately, the radio stopped working shortly after take-off and the rain and ice were so heavy that the pilot, Kingsford Smith, couldn’t see out of his front windscreen. Yikes! Fortunately, the plane made it all the way across the Tasman landing in Christchurch after a 14 hour trip.

Imagine that you were a member of the flight crew. Write a poem that describes how you would have felt when you landed safely in Christchurch after such a long trip. Remember, there are lots of different types of poems, and they don’t all have to rhyme. You can read more about different types of poems by clicking here.

Scared and cold
Butterflies in my stomach
Feeling unable to move
Wondering how long until we land


Summer Learning Journey: Week Two Day Two Activity Two: Art Deco

Activity 2: Art Deco
In the 1920s a new artistic movement emerged in New Zealand (and around the world). It was called ‘Art Deco.’ The picture to the right is a classic example of an ‘Art Deco’ piece. Take a close look at the painting. Do you like it?

On your blog, give the painting a rating out of 5 stars (1 star = terrible painting, 2 stars = pretty bad painting, 3 stars = okay painting, 4 stars = good painting and 5 stars = amazing painting). After you’ve rated the painting out of 5, tell us why you gave it that rating.

Right: Self Portrait By Tamara de Lempicka

I rate this 4/5, because it is very detailed well. The colours are popping and I like how there's different shades of green.

Summer Learning Journey: Week Two Day Two Activity One: Popular Culture – The Silent Movie

Day Two: The Roaring 20’s (The 1920s)
Activity One: Popular Culture – The Silent Movie
The 1920s saw a massive surge in the number of people going to the movies. Huge new cinemas were built in both Auckland (The Civic Theatre) and Dunedin (Empire De Luxe).  The most popular type of movies showing at local NZ cinemas were ‘silent’ films. Gold Rush is an example of an iconic silent film. It features a famous actor named Charlie Chaplin.

Watch the trailer for Gold Rush. On your blog, tell us what you think the movie is about. There are no words spoken movie so you will need to pay careful attention to what the actors are doing! Do you think you would enjoy watching a silent film? Why/Why not?

Gold rush is about a man who wants to join the gold rush so he heads north but soon gets trapped in a small house by a blizzard. Later on he was finally able to leave the house, he fell head over heads for a lady.

Personally I do enjoy watching silent films because there's no words thats spoken, I wouldn’t get the moving, and it’s not entertaining for me.

Monday, 25 December 2017

Summer Learning Journey: Week Two Day One Bonus Activity: In Flanders Fields

Bonus Activity: In Flanders Fields
As the new century dawned, New Zealanders settled into a period of relative calm. The calm lasted for about 15 years but came to a sudden end in 1914 when World War I erupted in Europe. The war lasted for almost five years and claimed the lives of 18,000 New Zealanders.

It also claimed the lives of thousands of men and women from countries around the world. Every year, we remember these brave men and women on ANZAC Day (25 April). Many people go to a special Anzac Day ceremony where they read a special poem that was written for the fallen soldiers. The poem is called ‘In Flanders Fields’ by John McCrae.

Read the poem. On your blog, tell us what you think of the poem. Do you like it? How does it make you feel?

It makes me feel very lucky to live in a beautiful, safe country like New Zealand. It also makes me feel sad for those who died in the war and for their families. I think that we are very lucky that they went to war and fought for our freedom. What do you think?

While reading the poem I felt grief for those who have died for our country in the war. I am thankful for those who have fought for us.

Summer Learning Journey: Week Two Day One Activity Two: The right to vote

Activity Two: The right to vote
At the turn of the century, New Zealand elected its first ever government. Richard John Seddon served as the leader of the Liberal Party from 1893-1906. Prior to 1893, only men were legally allowed to vote. This all changed in the late 1800s when a woman named Kate Sheppard lead a suffragist movement in New Zealand calling for a change in law. Her hard work finally paid off when the Electoral Act was passed into law on 19 September 1893, giving women the right to vote. New Zealand was the first country to give all women the right to vote. There were still countries in the world (e.g. Saudi Arabia) who, until recently, did not allow women to vote.

On your blog tell us what you think about the fact that women were not allowed to vote in Saudi Arabia until 2015. Is it fair? Why or why not?

Summer Learning Journey: Week Two Day One Activity One: St Joseph's Cathedral

Day One: The Early Years (Late 1800s – 1919)
Activity One: St Joseph’s Cathedral
At the turn of the century, there was a great deal of construction happening in New Zealand. Many of the new British settlers wanted to build homes and community meeting places, such as churches. One of the largest buildings to be constructed during this period was St Joseph’s Cathedral in Dunedin.

St Joseph’s Cathedral is just one of hundreds of beautiful cathedrals around the world.

Use your search engine to find a picture of another famous cathedral. Post a picture of the cathedral on your blog. Underneath the picture tell us: the name of the cathedral, where the cathedral is located, when it was built, and how long it took to build.

<Click on the photo to get a better view<

Friday, 22 December 2017

Summer Learning Journey: Week One Day Five Bons Activity: #EarnTheFern

Bonus Activity: #EarnTheFern
After the Treaty of Waitangi was signed, New Zealand became a British colony. Many other countries in the world are also British colonies including Canada, South Africa, Australia, India and Malaysia. As a group they were, and still are, called the ‘Commonwealth’ countries. Years ago, a man named Melville Marks Robinson was asked to organize a sporting competition for people living in the Commonwealth countries. It is called the Commonwealth Games. The first ever event took place in Hamilton, Canada in 1930.

Athletes from New Zealand have competed in the Commonwealth Games for years. In the most recent Commonwealth Games event in Glasgow, Scotland New Zealand athletes won a total of 45 medals. The next Commonwealth Games will be held in 2018 in the Gold Coast, Australia. Hundreds of athletes are competing for the chance to represent NZ at the games (to 'Earn the Fern').

One of New Zealand’s gold-medal-winning Commonwealth athletes was a man named Bill Kini. Bill won a gold medal at the 1966 Commonwealth Games for being the best heavyweight boxer. He was a man of many talents! He played rugby in Ōtāhuhu in the 1960s and later moved to Whangarei.

Imagine that you could interview Bill. What would you ask him about his time at the 1966 Commonwealth Games. What would you want to know? I’d like to know how he had time to train for two sports at once.

On your blog, write four questions that you would ask Bill Kini.

<Click on the photo to get a better view<

Summer Learning Journey: Week One Day Five Activity Two: The Treaty of Waitangi

Activity 2: The Treaty of Waitangi
On 6 February 1840, a very special document was signed by the Māori chiefs and the British settlers in New Zealand. It was called the Treaty of Waitangi (Te Tiriti o Waitangi) and it outlined how the two groups would live together and work together in New Zealand. It was the first document of its kind to be signed in the entire world. The Treaty was signed in a place called Waitangi in northern New Zealand.
Follow this Waitangi village link to read about the village of Waitangi.

On your blog, tell us three fun things that you can do as a visitor in Waitangi. Which one would you like to do the most?

I would like to witness the treaty because I always wonder what it

looks like in person, I ask myself questions like ‘can you read the
signatures?’ and other questions. So therefore I would like to visit
the treaty house.

<Click on the photo to get a better view<

Summer Learning Journey: Week One Day Five Activity One: Translating Phrases

Day 5: The Dawn of a New Era…
Activity 1: Translating Phrases
Unlike the Māori, many of the European settlers didn’t speak Te Reo Māori. Instead, they spoke English. As you can imagine, it was very difficult for the two groups to communicate because they did not have a dictionary or a translator. These days we are able to use the Internet to translate words and phrases from one language to another.

Use Google Translate to translate the following five phrases from English to Te Reo Māori or from Te Reo Māori to English. Post the translations on your blog. Be sure to include the phrase in both the English and Māori to earn full points.
  1. Nau mai ki Aotearoa.
  2. ____ is my name.
  3. What is your name?
  4. He pai taku ki te takaro i te whutupaoro.
  5. Where do you come from?

Click on the photo to get a better view

Thursday, 21 December 2017

Summer Learning Journey: Week One Day Four Bonus Activity: Musical Festivals - Matatini

Bonus Activity: Musical Festivals – Matatini

In New Zealand, a huge festival is held every two years, called Te Matatini. This performing arts festival celebrates the tikanga (culture or customs) of Māori. Kapa Haka groups from around New Zealand are invited to attend the festival and each group gives a 25-minute performance. The performances are judged and the best teams win prizes.

The gold medal winning team from this year (2017) was Te Kapa Haka o Whāngārā Mai Tawhiti.

Watch these three clips from previous Te Matatini festivals.

Te Iti Kahurangi

Te Puku o Te Ika

On your blog, rank the performances from your favourite (#1) to least favourite (#3) and tell us why you gave them the ranking that you did.

Summer Learning Journey: Week One Day Four Activity Two: Playing Games

Activity 2: Playing Games
Hundreds of years ago, young Māori children were taught to play a number of games, including Poi Rakau, Ki O Rahi, Koruru Taonga
and Poi Toa. Read about each of these four games on the Rangatahi tu Rangatira website. Have you played any of them before? Isn’t it cool how the games have been passed down for generations?

Choose one game, and on your blog, tell us the (i) name of the game, (ii) the goal or purpose of the game, and (iii) two rules.

You could try playing some of the games with a friend.


Summer Learning Journey: Week One Day Four Activity One: The Waiata - A Song in Your Heart

Thursday 21 December
Day Four: Hitting A High Note
Activity One: The Waiata - A Song in Your Heart

In the past, Māori would often use song as a way of sharing information or communicating emotions.  A waiata is the name given to a traditional Māori song. One of my all-time favourite waiata is Kia Paimarie. What about you?

Use Google to research traditional Māori Waiata. Listen to a number of Waiata and read the lyrics. On your blog tell us which one of the waiata you found you like the most. Why do you like it?

Wednesday, 20 December 2017

Summer Learning Journey: Week One Day Three Bonus Activity: Fun Family Facts

Bonus Activity: Fun Family Facts
Everyone’s family is unique. What makes your family special? Choose three people close to you and ask them what their two favourite things to do in summer are.

On your blog, write two fun facts about each person. For example, my Nana plays the bagpipes!

Click on the Photo to Get a Better View

Summer Learning Journey: Week One Day Three Activity Two: Acknowledging Ancestry

Activity 2: Acknowledging Ancestry
All of us are members of a family. Some of us have large families and some of us have very small families. When I have the opportunity to talk about my family and my ancestry I sometimes choose to use a pepeha. It is a very special way of identifying who I am and where I come from. There are many different versions of pepeha but most provide people with information about who you are and where you come from (i.e. your whakapapa). Use the template provided below to prepare your own unique pepeha. If you need help please watch this short movie clip on preparing a pepeha.
When you have completed your pepeha, post it on your blog. You could even post a video of you reading out your pepeha.

Ko Mt. Wellington te maunga
Ko Tamaki river te awa
Ko Tu’uga Salū Uelese tōku iwi
Ko Salū tōku hapu
Ko Te Tahawai tōku marae
Ko Save’u ahau
Ko Uaina rāua ko Maoimealelei ōku mātua